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5 Pairs Of Trainers That Are Going To Be Absolutely Huge This Year

Get a head start on this year's most desirable kicks

BY finlay renwick | Feb 14, 2018 | Shoes

Getty Images

Keeping up with trends, particularly when it comes to trainers, can be a tough old gig, can't it? Just when you feel like you've wrapped your head around the whole 'Ugly Runner' thing, another year passes and you're forced to reckon with a whole new schedule of hyped releases and ultra rare collaborations, the Balenciaga Triple S but a thick-heeled cog in the ever evolving wheel of obsessive sneaker fandom.

With 2018 properly under way, we've put together the definitive list of the year's guaranteed (we promise) most popular and coveted new and resurrected sneaker styles, the soon to be instant sell-outs and on-every-foot-in-the-highstreet pairs set to define another year in trainers.

Now where did we put those old Fila's?

Nike Air Max 270

Nike


First debuted at Astrid Andersen's January LFWM catwalk show, where the models were decked out in bright orange pairs, the Air Max 270 features Nike's tallest ever air max heel bag yet (shoutout to all the 5'9" bros), combining features from iconic styles like the Air Max 93 and 180.

Despite the clear retro influences, the 270 (the number relates to the 270 degrees of visible air around the heel) is being treated as a flagship new design that balances just the right amount of technology with an on-trend running shape and a sock-like fit.

The only fit we know.

Prada Cloudbust

The Prada Cloudbust as seen on ASAP Rocky; Getty Images

Misleading name aside (not a busted Stratus in sight as far as we can tell), Prada may well have a HIT on their well-tended hands with this unorthodox but strangely-desirable new design. The first high-end cult trainer of 2018.

An ambitious sort of mix between an Ugly Trainer, an F1 racing shoe and a more traditional high-tech runner, the Cloudbust even gets away with a velcro strap and - with ASAP Rocky recently spotted in a pair - already has the cosign of one of the world's most stylish men.

Adidas Futurecraft 4D

Adidas


A high-high-high tech model made in conjunction with Silicon Valley firm Carbon, the Adidas Futurecraft is entirely 3D printed, with a groundbreaking design featuring 20,000 individual "struts" (that honeycomb-like structure on the midsole) built with materials that begin life as a liquid before being transformed using "light and oxygen".

Sounds legit?

The premise is that the struts can be individually customised to deliver a better running experience. In reality, they just look pretty cool and are going to be ridiculously hard to get hold of.

Plus, they're 3-D printed.

Fila Venom

FILA


We live in a world where D.I.Y-enthusiast uncles and trendy streetstyle kids could soon be seen in identical trainers: identical trainers like the Fila Venom, a soon-to-be-released archive style that is being touted as the cost-effective solution to that Triple S craving that just won't go away.

The kind of shoe that will either garner subtle, knowing nods from 16-year-olds in bucket hats and mirthful inquisitions from... everyone else, the Venom is thick (thicc), it's bold and it's proof that tastes aren't what they used to be.

Whether that's a good or a bad thing is down to you...

Grandpa.

Virgil Abloh x Nike "MoMA" Air Force 1

 

“handwritten helvetica” @themuseumofmodernart

A post shared by @ virgilabloh on

Following swiftly on from the 10-piece collaborative series that helped Nike win big towards the end of last year, designer, DJ and all-round on-trend polymath Virgil Abloh has revamped the Nike Air Force one with silver accents, signature self-explanatory messaging ("Shoelaces", "AIR") and that conspicuous plastic tag. The one that implies: "I have these and you don't."

The good news is: these AF1's are very nice, while also suggesting that more designs are in the works (if you weren't lucky enough to win a raffle last time out), the bad news is: they are only available to buy at New York's Museum of Modern Art.

Oh.


From: Esquire UK


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