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Virgil Abloh Unveiled Three-Part Campaign for His First Collection at Louis Vuitton

Lessons learnt from childhood to adolescence forms the tone of the campaign

BY SANJEEVA SURESH | Feb 26, 2019 | Fashion

Image courtesy of Louis Vuitton

Louis Vuitton's Spring Summer 19 Campaign takes us on a journey to Oz. However, the story of Dorothy and friends isn’t the only thing the Men’s Artistic Director, Virgil Abloh looked at for inspirations. Chaptered in three phases released from January to March, this campaign aims to break down ideas of individual perception and instead create an inclusive, non-judging or conforming perspective through its imagery and clothes. Although the brand goes back its travel-centric core values of the late Louis Vuitton you won’t be seeing many of the brand’s signature embossed LV prints here.

Image courtesy of Louis Vuitton 

The first stage, revealed in January saw Abloh’s inspiration as an ongoing study of boyhood and the changing stages of man as he moves through infancy, childhood, and adolescence. 2-year-old Jack and 3-year-old Alieyth portray the innocence of infancy and the playfulness of childhood in the collection’s use of knitwear in rainbow colours and motifs from The Wizard of Oz, separately. Shot in surroundings of nature with the use of still and moving imagery, it portrays an image of youth that is still unaffected by preordained perceptions of gender, colour and creed.

Image courtesy of Louis Vuitton 

The second phase, The Painter’s Studio is a reimagined shot of a painting of the same name by French realist Gustave Courbet. While Courbet’s painting interpreted the ‘real world’ society from the eyes of the cultural elites; Abloh’s campaign portrays the diversity, inclusivity, and unity that defines his vision for Louis Vuitton.

Image courtesy of Louis Vuitton 

The final sequence of campaign, School Teens, shot by Raimond Wonda, was a modern take on schuttersstukken of Dutch Baroque. Students dressed in color-blocking t-shirts mirror the runway show where Abloh had invited 1500 students to form a rainbow. Shot in schools around LA, the images study how teenagers communicate in groups and explore their desire to belong, contrasted by the need for individuality.

Image courtesy of Louis Vuitton 
 

The use of (The) Wizard of Oz motifs in the collection and the campaign’s use of the rainbow colour spectrum send a clear message of hopefulness and inclusivity. And it seems like Abloh is living the dream right now.

 


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